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Archive for the 'carbon footprint' Category

Feed the little ones PB&J and save the planet

May
15

Something like that, at least.

When I first heard about the PB&J Campaign, I nearly dismissed the idea out of hand, because the campaign’s goal appears to be to make vegetarians out of us all.pbj-2.jpg

We are avowed carnivores in our house, and I have happily eaten veal and lamb. (Look, it’s hard for me not to inject a Homer Simpson drooling noise here, so let’s just leave it at that.)

Even so, it’s hard for me to argue that perhaps, as a society, we should eat less meat.

There. I said it.

This is the crux of the campaign:

Everything we eat comes from plants, whether we eat the plants directly or through an animal intermediary. The basic problem is that animals are inefficient at converting plants into meat, milk, and eggs. Relatively little of what they eat ends up in what you eat because animals use most of their food to keep them alive – to fuel their muscles so they can stand up and walk around, to keep their hearts beating, to keep their brains working.

That cow, pig, or chicken has to eat a lot more protein, carbohydrates, and other nutrients than it yields in meat, eggs, or milk. The result is that it takes several pounds of corn and soy to produce one pound of beef, or one pound of eggs, one pound of milk, etc. This holds true even if we’re measuring calories or protein; it takes several times the calories or protein in livestock feed to produce the calories or protein we get from the meat, eggs, or milk.

That made me think.

For every pound of beef, eggs or milk, we’re using several pounds of food that could be eaten by others elsewhere around the world.

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Posted by Amy Vernon on Thursday, May 15th, 2008 at 11:00 am |
| | 8 Comments »

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